Nintendo Switch: Are Physical Or Digital Games Better?

- Dec 26, 2019-

The Digital Advantage


The most obvious benefit of downloading a digital copy of the game to the console is that it does not take up any physical space. You will no longer have an old Switch game rack that you no longer use. You also don't have to worry about losing ink cartridges. Your brother cannot steal them and take them to a friend's house. When you're grounded, your parents can't take them away from you (though I think they can take the entire console).


Another important reason to go digital is that you will always have all your games wherever you are. This is especially useful for mobile games on Switch. Whether you download games directly to the console or a microSD card, you don't have to worry about carrying a protective case full of ink cartridges.


Digital games provide the convenience of true ownership.


Pre-order games may be more interesting. When you book a digital download of a game from Nintendo, it is preloaded on the device when you order. You can then start playing immediately after midnight on the day of the official release. No waiting in line or waiting for delivery. If you stay up all night long enough, most of your games can be completed, and your friends can even start working.


It doesn't sound like a hippie hugging a tree, but digital downloads also reduce the waste of games. Unlike plastic that handles ink cartridges, boxes, and sealed packaging, you are dealing with zero. This is a more environmentally friendly way to consume media.


If you are going to digitize, the microSD card should be on the priority list. The Nintendo Switch has only 32GB of internal storage, some of which are occupied by the system. This is enough to download some games, but you will run out of space soon. We recommend using a large-capacity microSD card, such as the Samsung EVO Select 256GB, to ensure you have enough space for all the games you need.

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The Physical Advantage


The most obvious benefit of buying a physical copy of the game is that you can share it with others. If your friends want to borrow The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, that's fine. If your brother wants to play Splatoon 2 in his Switch bedroom, he can sneakily take it out of his family. You can also skip the microSD card or choose a smaller SD card, because physical games only store saved data. Another cool benefit: a physical collector's edition with limited edition souvenirs such as statues, stickers, artwork and soundtracks. You don't usually get these things when you make a digital purchase.


You can also sell or trade physical games to help develop your entertainment habits; something digital buyers are still dreaming about. Some rare and out of print games are very expensive on the resale market. With physical games, you have a chance to become a collector.


If you are an old-school collector, exercise.


Selling old games is not the only benefit of buying a physical copy. You can also buy them cheaply in the resale market. Sometimes, if a game is selling very well or is not particularly popular (the price works strangely), they may sell for more than half of the full price. Also, retail stores often sell games, so you may be able to buy brand new games at discounted prices (especially if you are a savvy shopper). Digital games do sell from time to time in Nintendo stores, but they are a Nintendo momentary, not your discounting ability, and transactions are usually not as good as physical